CrossReach

CrossReach logo

The Church delivers and supports a range of social care programmes in Scotland through its Social Care Council, which operates under the name CrossReach.

As one of the country's largest provider of social services, CrossReach Services include care for older people, help with alcoholism, drug and mental health problems and assistance for homeless people and those with special learning needs.

Although CrossReach is part of the Church of Scotland, its range of services are available to people of all faiths or none at all. The Social Care Council's remit is to offer services in Christ's name and specialist resources to further the caring work of the Church to people in need, such as the elderly, children, families and those with learning difficulties. It also helps to identify areas of need and to guide the Church in pioneering new approaches to relevant problems in society and to make responses on issues arising in the council's areas of concern.

About CrossReach

CrossReach was launched in June 2005. It continues the Church of Scotland's long tradition of providing care and support which started back in 1869. We employ more than 2,000 staff and we support some of the most vulnerable people in Scotland. Just over one per cent of its funding comes directly from the Church of Scotland, with most of the rest coming from local authorities. Donations and legacies are also essential to help continue its vital care work.

What CrossReach do

CrossReach was launched in June 2005 and was previously known as the Church of Scotland Board of Social Responsibility. CrossReach continues the Church of Scotland's long tradition of providing care and support. In fact, this work started back in 1869, so CrossReach have a long history in the field of social care.

CrossReach employ more than 2,000 staff and support some of the most vulnerable people in Scotland. CrossReach has an annual expenditure of £51 million. Most of CrossReach's funding comes from local authorities, but also relies on donations and legacies.

CrossReach reports each year to the General Assembly and has the following remit:

  • To offer services in Christ's name to people in need as part of the Church's mission
  • To provide specialist resources to further the caring work of the Church
  • To identify existing and emerging areas of need, to guide the Church in pioneering new approaches to relevant problems and to make responses on issues arising within the areas of the Council's concern through appropriate channels such as the Church & Society Council, the Scottish Executive and the like

CrossReach's services

Here are a few case studies of people CrossReach have supported and cared for.

Substance Misuse

Christine turned up at one of CrossReach's residential rehabilitation services for those addicted to alcohol at a point in her life where "My addiction had eaten away at me, robbing me of my family, confidence, self esteem and finance; the feeling of loss and of being lost overpowered me." After her time with CrossReach, Christine is now free from her addiction, has rediscovered her faith and belief in herself.

Children and Families

Sid has been in foster care since being 6 weeks old. There is a plan to re-introduce Sid, now 11 months old, to his mother and family. The plan includes Sid and his mother attending a Baby Massage Training Group. Sid's mother was physically abused and beaten during pregnancy. The fight was with another drug dealer. Sid's parents met whilst teenagers – they were both in care. Sid's mum knows this is her "last chance" to keep Sid.

Learning Disabilities

Banff with my mum and dad, aye right! Daniel was 19 in a wheelchair, had Learning Disability, was introverted... and wanted a life. So, instead of Banff, went to Benidorm with guys of his own age on one of Crossreach's holiday's with support.

Daniel did not see it, but others watched his growth in self esteem and confidence with Crossreach as he became involved in interviewing staff for jobs, advocating for others and also a valued part of the team filming the lives of Crossreach Services. Daniel was no longer quiet and reserved, but outgoing, growing in competence.

And his parents... well they had a guilt free holiday in Banff, their first for 20 years where they could relax.

Older People

Mary developed dementia in her early 70s and was cared for by her daughter Sandra for several years. As Mary's health deteriorated the demands on Sandra and her family increased causing a great deal of strain. Despite this, it was with reluctance that Sandra eventually accepted that her mum should enter one of CrossReach's Specialist Dementia Care Homes. Several months later, Mary has settled well in her new home and Sandra has the knowledge that her mum is getting specialist care. Sandra now has peace of mind and enjoys her regular visits to her mum.

For further information visit the CrossReach website.

Independent Review of Historical Abuse

Social Care Council meeting minutes