Church of Scotland marks Climate Sunday in Glasgow alongside Christian partners

Last Sunday, 40 Christian denominations from across the UK came together for a special service marking Climate Sunday at Glasgow Cathedral, close to where the COP26 climate summit will take place in two months' time.

The Climate Sunday service took place at Glasgow Cathedral
The Climate Sunday service took place at Glasgow Cathedral.

Those who took part included members of the clergy, environmental charities and young people, with the aim of bringing the environmental commitments made by nearly 2000 congregations before politicians and the wider Church.

Many of those involved were 'speaking up' for the first time, joining thousands more in signing the 'Time is Now' declaration, which calls on the UK government to go further faster on climate action before hosting the COP26 summit in November.

Lord Wallace, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, said: "As we look to the COP26 taking place later this year, it has been an honour to join with ecumenical friends from England, Wales, and Ireland, as well as here in Scotland, to mark Climate Sunday at Glasgow Cathedral.

"The event took place on the first Sunday of Creation Time and was a chance to engage with the immense issues facing our planet through prayer and worship."

Over the past year, the Climate Sunday initiative has been asking churches to act, pray and speak up on climate change.

As well as signing the declaration, Christians were invited to take part by holding their own Climate Sunday services in parishes across England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland.

They were also encouraged to get involved with a church 'greening scheme', such as A Rocha's Eco Church, the Catholic Agency for Overseas Development's Live Simply or Eco Congregation in Scotland and Ireland.

Lord Wallace, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, at Climate Sunday
Lord Wallace, Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, at Climate Sunday

The movement has involved people from many diverse church traditions, which was reflected in the worship, and represents the largest ecumenical event before COP26.

Churches are also calling on the Government, in their role as chair of COP26, to be much more ambitious in seeking faster and deeper global emissions cuts and the delivery of long-promised finance to help poorer countries adapt to the climate disruption.

The Climate Sunday opened with representatives from the 40 denominations and Christian organisations processing into Glasgow Cathedral.

Music included hymns from by leading modern composers Keith and Kristyn Getty.

The service closed in commending COP26 in prayer (including in Welsh and Gaelic) and pledging the nations' churches to continue climate action.